SpringerLink
Forum Springer Astron. Astrophys.
Forum Whats New Search Orders


Astron. Astrophys. 354, 261-276 (2000)


Table of Contents
Available formats: HTML | PDF | (gzipped) PostScript

Slow surface wave damping in plasmas with anisotropic viscosity and thermal conductivity

M.S. Ruderman 1,5, R. Oliver 2, R. Erdélyi 3, J.L. Ballester 2 and M. Goossens 4

1 School of Mathematical and Computational Sciences, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS, Scotland, UK
2 Departament de Física, Universitet de les Illes Balears, 07071 Palma de Mallorca, Spain
3 Space & Atmosphere Research Center, Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH, England, UK (Robertus@sheffield.ac.uk)
4 Centre for Plasma Astrophysics, K.U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200 B, 3001 Heverlee, Belgium
5 on leave of Institute for Problems in Mechanics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 117526 Moscow, Russia

Received 23 April 1999 / Accepted 11 November 1999

Abstract

This paper studies the damping of slow surface MHD waves propagating along the equilibrium magnetic field on a finite-thickness magnetic interface. The plasma is assumed to be strongly magnetised, and the full Braginskii's expressions for viscosity and the heat flux are used. The primary focus of the paper is on the competition between resonant absorption in the thin dissipative layer embracing the ideal resonant position and the bulk wave damping due to viscosity and thermal conductivity as damping mechanisms for surface MHD waves. The dependence of the wave damping decrement on the wave length and the dissipative coefficients is studied. Application of the obtained results to the surface MHD wave damping in the solar chromosphere is discussed.

Key words: Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) – waves – methods: analytical – Sun: chromosphere – Sun: corona – Sun: oscillations

Send offprint requests to: M.S. Ruderman (michaelr@dcs.st-and.ac.uk)

© European Southern Observatory (ESO) 2000

Online publication:

helpdesk.link@springer.de