SpringerLink
Forum Springer Astron. Astrophys.
Forum Whats New Search Orders


Astron. Astrophys. 324, 395-409 (1997)

Previous Section Next Section Title Page Table of Contents

5. Simulations of the particle evolution

Now that we know the energy-loss rates of the pairs inside a new jet component, we can follow the evolution of such a pair plasma. In the first phase in which radiative losses are the only really important mechanisms, this can be done most easily by following the cooling of single particles and using the fact that the total particle number is conserved: Let

[EQUATION]

be the cooling rate for one particle. From [FORMULA] to [FORMULA] the particle energy reduces from [FORMULA] to [FORMULA] where

[EQUATION]

Particle number conservation implies

[EQUATION]

If we choose [FORMULA] small enough so that the explicit time dependence of f (which, e. g., represents the temporal variation of the background photon distributions) within one time interval is negligible, we find

[EQUATION]

This is used to follow the cooling of the injected pair plasma. In each time step, we calculate the emanating photon spectra (see Sect. 6) and use the respective synchrotron and SSC spectra in order to calculate the SSC cooling-rate according to Eq. (32) self-consistently.

Previous Section Next Section Title Page Table of Contents

© European Southern Observatory (ESO) 1997

Online publication: May 26, 1998

helpdesk.link@springer.de