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Astron. Astrophys. 329, 291-314 (1998)

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CHIANTI: an atomic database for emission lines

II. Comparison with the SERTS-89 active region spectrum

P.R. Young 1, E. Landi 2 and R.J. Thomas 3

1 Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, UK
2 Department of Astronomy and Space Science, University of Florence, Italy
3 Laboratory for Astronomy and Solar Physics, NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt MD 20771, USA

Received 24 June 1997 / Accepted 4 August 1997

Abstract

The CHIANTI database was described by Dere et al. (1997, hereafter Paper I) and the present paper applies the atomic data to the study of extreme ultra-violet emission lines found in the SERTS-89 active region spectrum published by Thomas & Neupert (1994). Firstly, the emission line ratios that are insensitive to density and temperature are used to check both the quality of the atomic data and the calibration of the instrument. Secondly, we use, where possible, ratios that are sensitive to density to estimate the electron density from different ions.

In general we find excellent agreement between theory and observation, providing confidence in both the atomic data in the CHIANTI database and the quality of the SERTS-89 spectrum. Where inconsistencies between theory and observation exist we try to explain them in terms of either inaccuracies in the atomic data or blending of the lines. One consistent discrepancy was that all observed lines that we analysed in the 430-450 Å region were uniformly a factor of 1.5-2.0 weaker than predicted, suggesting that the SERTS-89 calibration may need adjustment in this spectral interval. Serious problems were also found in some of the theoretical predictions for a few ions, especially Fe XIV.

Key words: atomic data – astronomical data bases: miscellaneous – Sun: UV radiation

Send offprint requests to: P.R. Young

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© European Southern Observatory (ESO) 1998

Online publication: November 24, 1997
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