SpringerLink
Forum Springer Astron. Astrophys.
Forum Whats New Search Orders


Astron. Astrophys. 351, 506-518 (1999)

Previous Section Next Section Title Page Table of Contents

3. Kinematics

In the epicyclic approximation used to describe the orbits of stars moving in a separable potential, the equations of motion are usually written in a rotating cartesian reference frame whose axes are respectively directed towards the galactic center, the direction of galactic rotation, and the North galactic pole. The equations of motion can then be written as

[EQUATION]

where I use a notation similar to that of Comerón et al. 1997 1, adding Eq. (4c) to describe the motion perpendicular to the galactic plane. The angular velocity of an object in a circular orbit around the galactic center at the position momentarily occupied by the Sun is [FORMULA] which, by definition, is also the angular velocity of the chosen reference frame with respect to an inertial one. [FORMULA] is the usual Oort constant for the case of pure galactic differential rotation, [FORMULA] is the epicyclic frequency in the galactic plane, and [FORMULA] is the oscillation frequency perpendicular to the galactic plane for orbits whose amplitude is well below the scale height of gravitating matter in the galactic disk. [FORMULA] and [FORMULA] describe the position of the guiding center of the epicyclic orbit, [FORMULA] is the amplitude of the epicycle in the galactocentric direction, [FORMULA] is the amplitude of the vertical oscillation, and [FORMULA] and [FORMULA] define the position of a star in its orbit at an instant t.

Developing the arguments of the trigonometric functions in Eqs. (4), and using the values of the coordinates and velocities at the initial instant [FORMULA], it is easy to show that Eqs. (4) can be written in the following compact form:

[EQUATION]

where [FORMULA], [FORMULA], [FORMULA]. The elements of the matrices [FORMULA], [FORMULA] are:

[EQUATION]

If the stars had a common origin so that the present age of the system is t, then the initial positions are related to the present ones and to the initial velocity pattern by

[EQUATION]

On the other hand, if the initial positions of stars were distributed on a plane tilted with respect to the galactic plane, then their initial positions fulfilled the relationship

[EQUATION]

where [FORMULA] is the vector perpendicular to the plane and [FORMULA] defines the location of the plane with respect to the origin of coordinates. Replacing Eq. (6) in Eq. (7),

[EQUATION]

It is then possible to show that, if the pattern of initial velocities can be expressed as a linear function of the initial coordinates of the stars, then the tilted plane remains as a tilted plane as the positions of its stars evolve with time under the influence of the galactic potential. Let the linear combination be expressed in a general form as

[EQUATION]

Using Eq. (6), one obtains after some algebra:

[EQUATION]

where [FORMULA] is the identity matrix. Replacing this in Eq. (8),

[EQUATION]

This can be expressed simply as

[EQUATION]

which is again the equation of a plane, whose perpendicular vector is now

[EQUATION]

and the present location of the plane is defined by

[EQUATION]

Given the geometry of stellar initial positions and velocities, it may be more convenient to write them in a reference frame whose axes are aligned parallel or perpendicular to the plane, and whose origin is chosen so as to simplify the expression of the initial law of motion. In such a reference frame, in which the position vector is denoted by [FORMULA], the initial law of motion can be written as

[EQUATION]

where the relation between [FORMULA] and [FORMULA] is

[EQUATION]

The rotation of axes is explicitly decomposed as the product of two rotations whose matrices are

[EQUATION]

The initial inclination of the plane with respect to the galactic plane is [FORMULA], and the longitude of the nodal line defined by the intersection of both planes is [FORMULA]. An expression analogous to Eq. (16) can be written for the velocity:

[EQUATION]

The initial law of motion expressed in the usual epicyclic motion base is thus

[EQUATION]

which gives the expression of [FORMULA]

[EQUATION]

The time evolution of the nodal line and the inclination are thus given by that of the vector [FORMULA], whose components are

[EQUATION]

This derivation allows a rather straightforward connection between the matrix [FORMULA] and the local values of the Oort constants, which can be measured from the observations. Developing Eq. (5) with the use of Eq. (9), one obtains:

[EQUATION]

Taking the time derivative of Eq. (21),

[EQUATION]

Using Eq. (21) to isolate [FORMULA], and replacing it in Eq. (22), one obtains

[EQUATION]

Taking spatial derivatives now, one obtains

[EQUATION]

where the elements of [FORMULA], [FORMULA], are

[EQUATION]

It should be noted that Eq. (24) is valid for any system of stars for which the epicyclic approximation applies, and whose initial positions and velocities are related by Eq. (9). The additional condition (7), implying that the stars are distributed in a plane, has not been used in deriving Eq. (24). This condition must be implicitly included in the expression of the spatial derivatives that will be actually used here in the calculation of the Oort constants, namely:

[EQUATION]

where the p subindex denotes the derivatives measured on the plane, and [FORMULA] is either x or y. Using these definitions, the Oort constants become

[EQUATION]

to which one can add the derivatives involving the velocity component perpendicular to the galactic plane, giving the components of the axis of vertical oscillation (see Eq. (3)):

[EQUATION]

Previous Section Next Section Title Page Table of Contents

© European Southern Observatory (ESO) 1999

Online publication: November 3, 1999
helpdesk.link@springer.de